Market Mondays: Kirkland- Juanita Neighborhood

As a resident and home owner of both a rental property and primary residence in Juanita, I may be a little bias to this community.  However, there is good reason for that….with still semi affordable home prices relative to the rest of Kirkland, proximity to Lake Washington and a growing community… this area is on fire!

Displaying 1956 view north of Juanita Bay.jpg

In the 1920’s, Juanita was home to the Juanita Beach Resort complete with a 2-story bath house and an amusement park!  The Juanita neighborhood is defined as NE 145th to the North, I-405 to the East, NE 132nd to the South and 100th Ave NE to the West.  In analyzing this specific market’s housing data, the biggest growth in property values are happening South of 124th and East of 98th with close proximity to Lake Washington and new construction developments on the horizon.

Displaying Juanita Beach 1950s.jpg

We are in a market where there is extremely low inventory!  As of October 19th, 2015 there are 12 active residential listings (excluding town homes and condos) in the Juanita neighborhood.  The price range is $359,950-$2.375M with a median list price of $715k.  An interesting observation is that $359,950 on the lowest end is located North of 124th, whereas the second most affordable listing is $499,950 located South of 124th (if you’re really interested in location specifics).

In the last 180 days, 17 homes are pending ranging from $350k-1.2M, with a median pending price of 625k.  To elaborate on pending, there have been 41 homes sold in the last 180 days ranging from 290k-1.15M, the median sale price was 500k and the average days on market is 8 days!!!  Another interesting note that I touched on in a previous blog post regarding pricing…homes that were priced strategically day 1 were the ones that sold in 8 days or less, AND sold for an average of 25k more than asking price!  The graphs below show months supply of inventory as well as list/sale price ratio graphics. (Note: the graphs only show data through September)

As you can see, the sale price/list price ratio is at or above asking price, this takes into consideration all of the data, including the homes that have sold for significantly over (all 8 days or less) as well as the homes that started out higher and dropped the price.

As of October 19th, 2015 Juanita has 1.5 months supply of inventory.  You can see that in August and September the months supply increased.  In my opinion, there were not many quality listings that came on during that time frame, and the ones that did come on the market were probably priced too high.  Those have since been absorbed but I will do another post updating the sale prices of these homes as we will see this impact in the market in October/November.

According to NWMLS September press release:

“Scarce inventory, new rules for mortgage closings and affordability concerns will likely slow home sales around Western Washington during the remaining months of 2015 and into early 2016, according to spokespersons from Northwest Multiple Listing Service.”

The “slow” months are a great time to both buy and sell a home.  Buyers will have less competition in a less frenzied sellers market and sellers will have little competition and attract serious buyers.  If you want “unbiased” real estate data, check out Seattle Bubble…it’s a great, data driven blog that illustrates some of the realities of the market.   It’s a nice balance to the sometimes “ra-rah” information coming from real estate professionals or skewed information from the media, but I always advocate clients to gather information from credible sources and think in a world where LOADS of information is available, it’s hard to sift through what is fact and what is BS.

I always welcome feedback, comments and questions so shoot me an email or text if you have any of the aforementioned!

Advertisements

Market Monday’s: Pricing in a Seller’s Market

What is my home worth?  It’s the question most home owners have and arguably the most important factor when deciding to sell a home.

In today’s hot seller’s market, where in King County there is a 1.4 months supply of inventory and a typical balanced market would be considered somewhere between 4 and 6 months supply.  According to a the most recent press release by NWMLS,  “Single family home prices across the 23 counties in the MLS report rose nearly 7.6 percent from a year ago, from $297,500 to $320,000. Single family homes in King County commanded the highest median price at $490,250, up 6.6 percent from the year-ago figure of $460,000, but down from June’s high of $500,000”.  Interestingly, 2,600 listings have expired this year in King County alone…the most common influencing factor? Overpricing.  Yes, it’s a sellers market but properties that sold for the most were strategic in pricing, ultimately attracting the most buyers when the property was most relevant and visible.  With all the valuation tools available to consumers (read 10 appraisals vs. Zestimates), below are some ways to take matters into your own hands and have a realistic look at your market area, ultimately helping you get the most for your home.

  • Study past sales. This is the starting point for any thoughtful and successful pricing strategy; think of it as the “science” part. Take the time to study past sale statistics for homes in your area and areas similar to yours. None will be identical, of course, but having a clear understanding of true market value is the first step in establishing your list price.
  • Do not confuse active listings with past sales. Active listings have not sold. They are just your competition. It is important to be aware of your competition’s pricing, but this is often just an indication of what your home won’t sell for.
  • Do not overprice because you have “time.” If the market is appreciating, this strategy may work, but if prices in your area are declining, you may quickly find yourself chasing a market and costing yourself money. And if the market is stable? Your home will just sit. Buyers pay in today’s dollars, and time is rarely on your side.
  • Leave some room for negotiation, but don’t overreach. No seller wants to feel he left money on the table, and no buyer wants to overpay. Your price should give both parties room to maneuver, but if it is too high, you risk being perceived as unrealistic, and buyers will pass over your home.
  • Think like a buyer. What are the things that you value in a home? Is it a large yard, an updated kitchen or a view? These are likely the same things that your buyer values as well. Talk to your agent about current buyer trends. Yesterday’s avocado green shag carpeting is today’s granite counter top. The property facing the interstate is going to be a tougher sell than the one with a mountain view. Your price should reflect how your home compares to the others offered for sale. Buyers will find objections to any home, as none is perfect, but it is curious how quickly objections disappear when the price is compelling.
  • React swiftly and decisively. If your home is on the market and is not being shown or if you receive feedback that you are priced too aggressively, don’t hesitate to adjust your price immediately!

First impressions are everything when selling your home. Studies have shown that the first two weeks on the market are the most crucial to your success. During these initial days, your home will be exposed to all active buyers making pricing and timing that much more critical.  If your price is perceived as too high, you will quickly lose this initial audience and find yourself relying only on the trickle of new buyers entering the market each day. Markets are dynamic, and your price has an expiration date. You have one chance to grab attention. Make sure your pricing helps you stand out on the shelf — in a positive way.

Oh, and here is a little infographic courtesy of Pinterest to help spruce up your curb appeal….

Tips for Selling Your Home; Curb Appeal. Curb appeal can mean the difference between a home that sells quickly for the asking price, and a home that sits for months on the market, below asking price.  #lakegeneva #fontana #curbappeal. http://agents.keeferealestate.com/michalene_melges/:

Market Mondays: Kirkland

simple_tranquil_living_logo.jpg

Happy Monday everyone! The Holidays are over, football season has ended and the post Super Bowl depression has started to lift…that means people are getting back into thinking about real estate!

This week, we are taking a quick look at the current market in Kirkland, Washington.  If you want to see what is happening in your immediate neighborhood, download my app at http://jlsapp.com/rachelwagner , this will show you all the active listings in your area as well as pending and sold! It’s a great resource to have at your fingertips and I use it personally daily and clients also love it! If you want more information on a property, you can request it on the spot and I will get back to you immediately.

Currently, there are 105 active listings in Kirkland, ranging from $234,000-3.4 million with a median list price of $900,000.  In the last 90 days, there have been 116 residential/condominium sales ranging from $220,000-3.12 million, with the median sale price of $860,000.  The graph below shows months of inventory based on closed sales.  Currently, we are in what is considered a “sellers market” with 1.8 months supply of inventory, up slightly from the end of December and similar to the numbers seen in January.  As we move into the Spring months, this may fluctuate slightly with the increase of inventory.  With historically low interest rates, however, it’s a great time to purchase a home in any area…Kirkland being one of the hottest markets in the greater Seattle area.

The home below is listed for $489,500 on 112th st in Kirkland, Washington and is a perfect home for first time home buyers on a large lot, beautifully updated and located near the Kirkland Corridor trail, elementary school, gym and within walking distance from Juanita beach park and shopping.  Call/text 425.324.0302 if you are interested in more information.

Credit 101: True or False

I receive a lot of questions on a daily basis from prospective buyers (especially first time home-buyers) relating to finances and primarily, CREDIT! Today, we are playing a little game of True or False as they relate to all things credit! What I love about Real Estate is the opportunity to learn and grow on a daily basis.  Many times, I grow right along with the people I’m working with and seek out answers to things I’m unsure of.  Yesterday, I had the opportunity to speak with David Bryce, Senior Loan Officer with Priority Home Lending and he broke down some of your most common credit questions.  If you are considering purchasing a home, I highly suggest giving him a call at 425.466.4533 and know he will be able to answer any questions you may have as they relate to financing. Also, feel free to email rachelwagner@johnlscott with any other questions you may have, I’m always happy to help!  Happy Wednesday and I hope you learned as much as I did in the following Q&A.

1.  Paying off an account that has been turned over to the creditor’s collections department or a collection agency will increase your credit score.

Sorry to start out with what amounts to a trick question but, the correct response is false- most of the time.  Only if the account has gone into collections recently is it wise to pay it off.  Older accounts should be left alone.

Scoring systems place the most emphasis on the most recent activity in your credit record.  Paying off collection accounts, no matter their age, registers as recent activity.  Consequently, the closer such a step takes place to pulling a credit report, the lower your score will be.  If the date of the last activity exceeds 12 months, leave it alone.

If the mortgage lender requires that you pay off an account in collections as a condition of obtaining funding, do so as part of the closing process so it will not impact the score the lender will pull shortly before closing to make sure nothing detrimental has happened to your credit since the loan was first approved.

2.  Closing a credit card account will increase your score.

False.  Closing a credit card could actually lower your score because the amount of revolving credit available to you will decrease.  Rather than close an account, keep your balance below 30% of its limit.  Credit scoring models rate debt utilization or the amounts owed on your accounts, almost as important as payment history.

3.  Having cash on hand in a saving account will improve your score.

False.  While lenders prefer that borrowers have some cash reserves to tide them over in case of emergency, scoring systems look only at credit.

4.  Borrowing money from a finance company is no different than borrowing from a bank.

False.  All credit accounts are not ranked equally.  Credit from finance companies will score lower than a bank card, travel and entertainment card, oil card or auto loan.  Ditto for payday loans, cash advance loans, check advance loans, post dated check loans or deferred deposit check loans.

5.  Seeking the help of a qualified consumer credit counselor will automatically improve your score.

False.  More often than not, a credit counselor negotiates on behalf of the consumer to make a lower monthly payment on an overdue account.  Even thought the creditor agrees, it is not the same arrangement for which the consumer signed up originally.  As a result, the payment more than likely will appear as late on the person’s credit report.

6.  You only need to worry about your credit score when you are buying a big ticket item such as a house or automobile.

False.  With the amount of fraud and identity theft taking place, all of us should check our credit reports at least once a year, and Credit Plus recommends twice.  By law, you are entitled to one free copy annually. Go to http://www.annualcreditreport.com to get your free annual report.

7.  Your credit score differs, depending on the item you are purchasing.

True.  Different industries use different scoring models, so scores will change, depending on whether you are buying a house, purchasing a car or applying for insurance.  Make sure your lender uses a score developed solely for the mortgage business.  Others are almost always 50 to 60 points higher than the score developed solely for the mortgage business.

8.  A finance company credit card scores the same as any other credit card.

False.  Finance company cards, which typically allow borrowers to open a store account with zero interest for a year, weigh more heavily on credit scores.  Worse, when you open the account, the creditor sets your limit at the cost of your purchase, meaning the card is maxed out and well above the 30% balance you should strive not to exceed.

9.  Negative credit information can stay on your record forever.

False.  Generally, negative information remains on your report for seven years from the last activity.  But if it involves a bankruptcy, it can stay for as long as 10 years.  The exception is a federal tax lien, the removal of which is determined by a prescriptive period.

10.  There’s nothing wrong with using your maiden name when pulling your credit report.

False.  Always use the same, full legal name.  Being consistent will help avoid confusion with other borrowers with the same name as yours.  Not all credit bureaus use Social Security numbers as the primary means of identification.

11.  If you have poor credit and cannot obtain credit on your own, the best ways to start rebuilding your credit record is by obtaining a secured credit card or asking someone to co sign with you for a major credit card.

True.  One reason for a low score is because there is not enough “positive’ revolving credit in your report.  Indeed, in many cases, when “positive” credit is added, a score will increase.

Simply Home: Wednesday Inspiration

Displaying FullSizeRender.jpg

I think it’s safe to say that Pinterest is a great source of home inspiration, providing a wonderful resource for DIY home improvement projects and crafts.  The photo above depicts a mantle project that took me under 2 hours to complete, which included painting (white chalk paint, amazing), creating the banner and the sign.  Although my version may pale in comparison to some of the following mantle photos, it brought a huge amount of light and joy into our home, welcoming the Holiday season. We have quite a few home improvement projects planned in the future, so expect to see more of these as we continue the process of updating our home!  ENJOY!

Be Thankful Thanksgiving Mantel & Gratitude Frame - Landee See Landee Do

Simply Country Life: Rustic Burlap and White Pumpkin Fall Wreath

I drew inspiration from the “give thanks” concept, a nice modern twist to Thanksgiving decor

11 Inspiring Fall Mantles - cute mantle, can't find the 11 though...looks like a good blog though - cute tutorials!

Beautiful Fall display

Mod Vintage Life: Elegant Thanksgiving

Elegant Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving Table Center Piece via Amy Huntley (The Idea Room)

Lovely Table Centerpiece

Pretty Painted Pumpkins

Orchard Girls: Top 12 Fall Decorating Ideas definitely will have a fireplace in the house we buy. :)

And remember…..

7 Inspirational Quotes That Remind Us To Find Comfort In Our Homes (PHOTOS)

Market Mondays: 2015 Economic Forecast

simple_tranquil_living_logo1.jpg

This week I have decided to step back briefly and look at the market from a macro level as well as discussing predictions for 2015 that were shared at a recent conference.  It’s interesting and exciting to see where the housing market is headed, as well as the economic health of the real estate market as we head into 2015.  Before I dive into that information, as of October 27th, 2014 King County is at about 2.6 months supply of inventory while Snohomish County is hovering around 3.1 months supply of inventory.  Those numbers are a 4.2% increase from October 2014 in King County and a 6.2% increase in Snohomish.  With interest rates at a 16 month low, it is a great time to get in there and take advantage of this market if you are thinking of buying or selling your home.

What is the state of the real estate market?  Well, we are currently down 10.6% nationally from peak values in 2006, however, we are slowly making our way back up as demonstrated by the graph below.

Displaying photo 1.PNG

Displaying photo 2.PNG

As demonstrated above, all but one top 30 metro areas show annual home value appreciation.  Seattle Metro leads the Puget Sound in annual home value gain at 8.3%, while other areas of the country who were drastically impacted by the recession are seeing a big jump in annual appreciation as well.

Displaying photo 3.PNG

Seattle Metro is currently down 11.5% from it’s peak, compared to the national average of 10.6%.

Displaying photo 4.PNG

Displaying photo 1.PNG

Although Seattle Metro is slightly below the national average, what we are seeing is a steady increase in inventory, resulting in a healthier and more sustainable market as well as softening the rate of appreciation (which is still significant, regardless).  The nature of markets are to rise and fall (think rolling hills), however, slow and steady is preferred over sharp inclines and falls.

Are you ready for some good news?

Displaying photo 2.PNG

According to the National Association of Realtors and as demonstrated by the Zillow Real Estate Research for Professionals tool, negative equity has declined steadily since quarter 1 of 2012, which is great news for home buyers and home owners alike.  However, negative equity remains at 17% nationally and is highest in the bottom value tier.  The number of homes underwater is above 25% nationally and 30% in the Seattle area.  The middle value tier is 13% and the top value tier is 6% in the Seattle area.  Although these numbers are declining annually, there are still many homeowners who are underwater, especially in the bottom value tier.

As we move into 2015, mortgage rates are expected to rise, with interest rates expected to reach the 5% mark (which is still fantastic, historically), while rent affordability is below the historical average on a national level.  Renter households are forming faster than owner households for the first time since the late 1980’s and the market is responding with higher rental rates and a shortage of available rentals while the market struggles to keep up with the demand.  (translation: don’t rent if you can buy!)

Displaying photo 3.PNG

Below are some year over year percent change forecasts for Snohomish County, by city.  Appreciation rates are expected to continue to gain, however, slightly less than in 2014.  With rental rates skyrocketing, as well as a shortage of available rentals and low interest rates, now is a great time to get into a home for a first time home-buyer.  Investment properties in the bottom value tier to generate rental income are also a great option, it’s an exciting time in the real estate market around the country.  Please contact me with any questions you have at rachelwagner@johnlscott.com or call/text 425.324.0302.  I am available to help with any of your real estate needs.

And in other Simple Tranquil Living news, the holidays are quickly approaching! Okay, so that may not be news to you, but here at Simple Tranquil Living we have a lot of fun with holiday festivities so stay tuned for a special Halloween post and perhaps another GIVEAWAY! Happy Monday everyone!  

Market Monday’s: Kirkland Single Family Homes

photo

Happy Monday! Fall has definitely made its way here, leaves are dropping, rain is sprinkling and the housing market? Well, it’s still trucking right along here in Kirkland. The photo above is from our Sunday night run out Carillon Point in Kirkland, fall here can be quite lovely! The change in seasons typically brings a slight drop in real estate activity, this year however, is proving to be different.  As we adjust to the “new normal” as far as the real estate market goes, if there is one, foreign investors are still driving the market and the economy as well as job growth continues to grow at a healthy pace.

As of September 29th, 2014 there are 160 single family homes for sale in Kirkland, Washington.  The range of list price for these homes range from $265K-$2.2 Million with a median list price of $940K.  When we take a look at the 216 homes that have been sold in the last 90 days, the sale price ranges from $307K-7.5 Million with a median sale price of $750K.  An interesting aspect of this data is that the median “days on market” for the active listings is 80 days, while the median “days on market” for the sold and pending properties is only 17 days.  Why such a big difference? Well, first of all, some of these homes could have been taken off the market and relisted with the intention of creating buzz around the homes again…similar to a grand reopening, a way to invite the backlog of buyers to explore again.  However, what is more likely is that many of the homes that have been on the market for longer are either not priced correctly OR have passed the “sweet spot” for buyer interest.  Currently, Kirkland is at 2.2 months supply of inventory, which is still significantly below what we would call a normal or “healthy” supply, so when I talk about homes sitting on the market, it’s really not long at all when looking at the bigger picture.

We are beginning to see some price drops happening across the board, which I will be talking about in a post later this week.  I will also be talking about how you can add value to your home with simple exterior and interior projects if you are thinking about selling your home, so stay tuned!

Kirkland is still seeing an almost 100% list/sale price, demonstrating the demand for the area.

August 2014 saw 2.3 months of inventory and we are hovering around 2.2 for the month of September as well.  A normal supply is 6 months, we are still operating in a sellers market or an under supply.